09.03.12: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

Thanks to Jen and Kellee at Teach Mentor Texts for hosting the meme “It’s Monday! What are you reading? From Picture Books to YA”. Check out Jen and Kellee’s site to see what others are reading through their posted links. You can also find posts from folks using the hashtag #IMWAYR on Twitter.

Happy Labor Day! The sun is out here in Seattle for the holiday weekend and the back-to-school supplies and first day outfits are just about complete for school restarting for my daughters on Wednesday. We will officially have a fifth grader and third grader under our roof! This will be the first year in many that I won’t be heavily involved in the PTSA, so stepping back will be a new role for me, but one I’m needing for a while. It will give me some time to reflect on what I want to do when I grow up. In the meantime, I read!

Book-A-Day Challenge: 72 books

Read to date: 79 books

Days into the challenge: 70 days

Click on the cover images for the synopsis of each book.

Picture books

   

I enjoyed both these books a lot. A slight nod goes to How Rocket Learned to Read for it’s story as kids will love that. Rocket Writes a Story, however, has its own merits and would be so great to share with primary grade kids about the writing process. I love the expressive illustrations.(2010 and 2012)

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The plot felt a little forced, but Dectective (Little Boy) Blue solves a mystery with the help of lots of nursery rhyme characters. Tedd Arnold, of Fly Guy fame, does these illustrations with a great comic book-feel. (2011)

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I read this stack of 1955 Caldecott Award year books. Look for my write up later in the week.

Novel for middle grades:

Angleberger has another hit with this third installment in the Origami Yoda series. The origami wisdom continues to spill forth to the BLANK middle school, this time dispensed through a Chewbacca fortune teller animated by Sarah with some help from Han Foldo as translator. Like the previous books tween social problems and worries are told from various viewpoints in a witty manner. My youngest, in third grade, adores the series, though I’m sure some of tween-ishness is over her head. (2012)

Finished on audio . . . 

The Famous Five was a favorite series that I enjoyed from my childhood, so this was a fun way to share it with my kids. Here the four British kids and their loyal dog have a fun and mysterious adventure by the sea. The narrator did a great job with the voices for a huge number of characters. (1953)

Finished for The Newbery Challenge:

This was not as painful as I had suspected it would be, but I’m not sure I’d recommend it beyond someone specifically looking to learn more about life in 1920s China. It is the tale of a young apprentice coppersmith who finds him self in all kinds of adventures and mishaps. (1932)

This week’s Reading Adventures:

Continuing these books–

1936 Newbery Medal

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My oldest and I are really enjoying the suspense of this as a read aloud. (2012)

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What are you reading? Have a great reading week!

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14 comments on “09.03.12: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

  1. You have some great books here! I loved Rocket and Fortune Wookiee and I like both books you have up next. Have a great reading week!

  2. I still need to read Rocket Writes a Story. I am sure it is as adorable as the first. Have a great week! 🙂

  3. Myra GB says:

    I read Caddie Woodlawn when we had our girl power bimonthly theme but didn’t have a chance to review it. I found Caddie very charming. We haven’t made much headway on the Newbery Medal challenge unfortunately, hopefully we pick it up towards the end of the year. We have a few more books to read and review before the challenge is over. I’ve been seeing and hearing so much about the Origami Yoda series, and I’m definitely intrigued. Next time we make a trip to the library, I’d be sure to find this one.
    My daughter is in 5th grade too! Start of the school year blues. 🙂

  4. I love the Rocket books & still haven’t gotten to the Origami Yoda books, too much to read! I definitely will look for your Famous Five books. They look like they will fit some of those middle readers looking for mysteries. Thanks, Lorna.

  5. I still haven’t read these Rocket titles.I must get my hands on them. They look just fantastic. I used How to Teach a Slug to Read with my reading group last year when we were talking about how we had learned to read and it was delightful! The kids always respond to picture books about reading and writing so well!

  6. Lorna says:

    Thanks, Crystal. You will like Rocket Writes–lots of ways to talk about writing with young kids.

  7. Lorna says:

    Katherine–isn’t Tom Angleberger, genuis?

  8. Lorna says:

    Hi, Myra! Thanks for stopping by. I’m enjoying Caddie, which is re-read from childhood, though I’ve been picking it up with very tired eyes the last few days and am making very slow progress! You should definitely check out the Origami Yoda series!

  9. Lorna says:

    Hi Linda,
    The Famous Five books are great fun and remind me in many ways of the Melendey Series (The Saturdays, Four Story Mistake, etc.) but with an infusion of mystery.

  10. Lorna says:

    Oh, Carrie–you must take a peek at those Rocket books. I’m curious to see if others think the When Rocket Writes a Story could be helpful in talking about writing with young students.

  11. Aren’t the Rocket books fantastic? I love that they each have a lesson to share, without sounding too textbookish. And cute illustrations!

  12. Lorna says:

    Maria–I totally agree. I love it when a picture book is both entertaining, but also has lots of teachable moment/mini-lessons wrapped up into it!

  13. Lettie says:

    I miss back to school time! The Rocket books look cute and fun!
    I’m also excited to see you read Famous Five- one of my favourite series!
    Have a lovely week 🙂

  14. Earl says:

    Yay for Rocket! It’s true what you wrote about the expressive illustrations.

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